Tuesday, 24 April 2018

Monday, 5 February 2018

Medomsley Detention Centre (Memo)

"Believe Nothing” Or Who Has Said It..!
Unless It Agrees With Your Own Reason and Your Own Common Sense.!
And It Is Fully Supported By Documented Facts..!


Our Testimonies Will Convict And Imprison All Accountable For Inhuman Crimes Committed Against Medomsley Victims....!

Not a Screw Looking For a Deal !
No Deals Have Been Tabled As a Option” And Do Not Exist...!

Our Same Moto Stands Today” As It Was Many Years Ago” Our Quest For Justice”
Will Not Be a Battle.” But a Long Fought War..!
And If We Can’t Find a Way’ We Will Make One...!
For The Eyes of The Future Are Looking Back At Us..!
And They Are Praying For Us To See Beyond Our Own Time..!
It’s Not Who.”It’s Not When.”Its Right Now’ And It Is Us ! Medomsley 1500.

We are more concerned regarding the
6 Suspects That weren’t Charged”!

So if Any Screws Have Turned Queen’s Evidence”
And That’s a Big If..’ They Will Consist Of The 6’ Suspects.”
This Is Just 1’ Reason To Why We Must Challenge The CPS.!
Though The Initial Challenge’ Is The CPS Get Out Of Jail Card..”

“Therefore We Believe’ No Further Action Will Be Taken” As It Is Not In The Publics Interest”

The Suspects Defence Barristers” But For The Exception Of 1” Suspect.
Don’t Give a Shit For The Screws.”
They Are Representing Both The Prison Service and The POA.!’
The Prison Officers Association’ For Ref:
Is The Screws Union !
And Like 2003 Neville Husband Trial At Newcastle Crown Court.”!
The Barristers Instructions Will Be Damage Limitations.


The very first 2 suspects to be questioned in relation to Medomsley commenced in August 2015”

Simultaneously officers from Seabrook attempted to make 2 arrests !

1” was still a working in The Prison Service.
1” was retired.
One living in Manchester and the other in Liverpool.

But when Durham turned up at they’re homes to bring them in for voluntary questioning !
Durham got caught off guard’
As both gave the same brief statements !

We have been advised to make no comment and advise yous to contact The POA’ and closed they’re doors on Police.

Durham were stunned and returned back to HQ”
The head SIO’ of OperationSeabrook at the time:
Paul Goundry had to seek guidance from The CPS.
The CPS sent 2 of they’re Crown Prosecutors to join the OperationSeabrook Team’ to assist and give guidance, to ensure no legal technicalities were breached.

The exact date Durham went these doors was
Monday 4th August 2015

How do I know this information ?

2 Days Later:
Both my MP and myself were given this update at a meeting with Durham’s SIO’s on Wednesday 6th August 2015”
The meeting was headed by
SIO Brad Howe !
As although Paul Goundry was present’ he had just returned back from annual leave on that very day, and was not up to date with Investigation.

Confirmation of the above information and meeting by my former
MP Michael McCann.
•••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••••
 
 

Monday, 29 January 2018

Medomsley detention centre abuse: 17 may face charges

Up to 17 former custody officers could be charged with sexual abuse and other crimes after a police investigation into Medomsley Youth Detention Centre in Consett, Co Durham, involving more than 1,500 victims.

The Sunday Times understands the Crown Prosecution Service is preparing to issue “multiple charges” against the suspects by March, after one of the biggest investigations into abuse at a state-run facility seen in the UK.

Operation Seabrook has involved dozens of officers — thought at one point to be up to 100 — looking into mass complaints of abuse committed at Medomsley in the 1970s up to 1988.

The investigation has uncovered evidence that 14 boys had reported abuse at Medomsley to police officers immediately after they left the centre. One officer alone took complaints from five separate boys. It is thought that no action was taken.

The independent inquiry into child sex abuse, set up in 2014 to look at abuse of children in care, is examining how the “scale of abuse” at Medomsley could have gone “undetected for so long”.

John McCabe, 52, who was abused at the detention centre by a guard and whose campaigning work helped to trigger the inquiry, said: “The police at the time knew about the abuse going on. Some of those complaints are before I was sent to Medomsley.

“If they had listened, what happened to me and others like me might never have happened.”

The detention centre, which closed in 1988, was used for teenage offenders who had typically committed minor crimes. The boys, aged 17-21, were usually held for six to eight weeks.

Separately, officers have been investigating a suspected paedophile ring operating at the establishment centred on the notorious Neville Husband, who was in sole charge of the kitchens at Medomsley. He later became a church minister.

In 2003 he was jailed for eight years for committing sex attacks on five young Medomsley inmates from 1977 to 1984. His sentence was increased to 10 years in 2005 after new victims came forward and he admitted attacks on four more boys. Police believe the true number of his victims could be in the hundreds.

Paul Goundry, the former senior investigating officer for Operation Seabrook, wrote to one victim, saying: “Husband took numerous inmates off site to be abused by others. I believe this was a paedophile ring and that those involved could have come from a number of associations that Husband had.”

Husband’s former colleague, Leslie Johnson, a storeman, was also jailed for six years in 2005 for sexual offences. Both men have since died.

Detective Inspector Andy Smith, of Durham constabulary, said Operation Seabrook was one of the largest investigations of its kind in the country.

In another development, seven men have been charged with misconduct in public office and physical abuse. Some have been charged with sexual abuse. Their trial is due to start at Teesside crown court in September. They are Christopher Onslow, 71, Brian Johnson Greenwell, 70, Alan Bramley, 69, John McGee, 73, Kevin Blakely, 65, David McClure, 62, and Neil Sowerby, 61.

When McCabe was sent to Medomsley it was designed to be a “short, sharp shock” for stealing two rings from a pawn shop. He got a job in the kitchens, but faced abuse and rape by Husband. “I want to see justice for everybody who went through hell at Medomsley,” he said. “We will never forget.”

Anyone who believes that they are a victim and has not already contacted the police should email operation.seabrook@durham.pnn.police.uk 

Source

Sunday, 28 January 2018

Up to 17 former custody officers face sex abuse and other charges as police probe paedophile ring at youth detention centre

  • Up to 17 former custody officers may face charges of sex abuse and other crimes
  • Medomsley Youth Detention Centre became the centre of a police investigation
  • Evidence indicates that 14 children reported the abuse after they departed
  • However it is believed that the complaints were not followed up
  • As part of a different investigation, police are looking into a potential paedophile ring at the detention centre
Following an investigation at a closed youth detention centre, as many as 17 former custody officers may be charged with sexual abuse and other crimes.

Medomsley Youth Detention Centre in County Durham became the centre of a police investigation, with over 1,500 victims involved in the enquiry.

Operation Seabrook, which has been looking into the alleged incidents, has discovered evidence which indicates that abuse was reported by 14 children as soon as they departed Medomsley, reports the Sunday Times.

 Medomsley Youth Detention Centre in County Durham became the centre of a police investigation, with over 1,500 victims involved in the enquiry

However, it appears that these complaints were not followed up.
Medomsley, in Consett, closed in 1988.

As part of a different investigation, police are looking into a potential paedophile ring at the detention centre, which infamous Neville Husband is believed to have been involved in.

After a 2003 investigation, warden Neville Husband was jailed for 12 years.
Det Supt Paul Goundry, former head of safeguarding for Durham Constabulary said in 2013: 'Neville Husband preyed on some of the most vulnerable children and young people in our society and left many of them with mental scars which have lasted a lifetime.

Former detainee John McCabe (left) revealed last year was attacked by members of a gang he said raped him 'every single day' at Medomsley. Neville Husband (right) abused him
Another officer, Leslie Johnson, was imprisoned for six years following the same investigation.

County Durham Police have charged seven former staff with a number of offences including corruption, physical abuse and sexual abuse. 

They are Christopher Onslow, 71, Brian Johnson Greenwell, 70, Alan Bramley, 69, John McGee, 73, Kevin Blakely, 65, David McClure, 62, and Neil Sowerby, 61. They are all former members of staff at Medomsley.

Former detainee John McCabe revealed last year was attacked by members of a gang he said raped him 'every single day' at Medomsley. He says he was abused by Neville Husband.

Police re-launched their investigation called Operation Seabrook four years ago after complaints were ignored, amid claims many boys were systematically abused by 'agents of the state' in the 1970s and 1980s.

Mr McCabe, who suffered six months of attacks and has waived his right to anonymity to tell his story, told the Daily Mirror: 'I was asked to work in the kitchens. That's where I met him (Husband). 

He told me if I didn't do what he wanted he'd kill me and nobody would care.

'I thought I was the only boy he abused. Now I know there were more. A lot more. And it wasn't just him.

'I'm fighting for justice for those boys, for myself. Too many people have got away with this for far too long.'

Anyone who believes they are a victim and has not already contacted the police should call Durham Police on 101 or email: operation.seabrook@durham.pnn.police.uk

Monday, 22 January 2018

‘Short, sharp shock’ ruined my life: Abuse victims describe brutal reality of youth detention centres under Thatcher

Margaret Thatcher’s authorities rode into workplace on the again of a manifesto that promised to battle crime by giving younger offenders a “brief, sharp shock” at detention centres.

Ministers claimed army-style self-discipline would deter kids from a lifetime of crime, however the boys who lived by means of the brutal regime the coverage impressed by means of the late 1970s and 1980s inform a really completely different story.

It’s considered one of beatings, humiliation and sexual assault at “sadistic, brutal focus camps”, with some youngsters pushed to suicide and others saying the trauma sparked a worsening cycle of violence and habit.

“We have been bodily abused every day, it was a time once I believed they might kill me,” mentioned Keith, who was imprisoned on the age of 14.

Dozens of victims are calling for a public inquiry into the abuse as police examine allegations regarding Medomsley Detention Centre in County Durham and Kirklevington Detention Centre in North Yorkshire, the place over 400 victims have already come ahead.

However the scale of the abuse is much wider in response to males who’ve instructed The Impartial of their therapy at centres as far aside as Kent, Lincolnshire and Gloucestershire.

James Carré-Rice mentioned he “spiralled into violence” after being held at Whatton Detention Centre in Nottinghamshire and went on to serve three extra sentences.

“Once I acquired to reception one of many officers got here out and requested me my identify, he appeared fairly pleasant,” he mentioned.

“I mentioned it was Jimmy and he punched me within the face and mentioned: ‘It’s a must to name me Sir’.

“It was terrifying for everyone. They have been grown males, they didn’t like us.
margaret-thatcher-1.jpg
Margaret Thatcher’s authorities introduced within the brief, sharp shock regime within the perception it could scale back reoffending (Getty)
“We weren’t doing something incorrect however each considered one of us was crushed, punished, humiliated.”

Mr Carré-Rice, who has since written books primarily based on his experiences, mentioned the abuse gave the impression to be “random”.

He was 15 on the time and described different kids within the centre crying at evening, including: “The way in which they have been handled was out of all proportion to what they’d finished incorrect and it despatched them the incorrect approach.

“I can bear in mind them drumming into your head that you simply have been scum, you have been nugatory, you have been ineffective, a failure to society. It’s tough to shake these labels off.”

Considered one of Mr Carré-Rice’s faculty mates was imprisoned throughout the identical centre, being severely crushed by officers who caught him dancing in a hall. Inside a month of his launch, the boy hung himself.

He mentioned the concept of disciplining youngsters utilizing violence just like the “brief, sharp shock” would by no means work, including: “When you have a system like that, you’re reinforcing cycles of behaviour that you simply’ll by no means get out of… nobody thought it by means of.

“I feel the workers thought they have been doing their obligation for king and nation however there have been no parameters or system of management.”

Mr Carré-Rice’s good friend was not the one inmate to die after leaving a Thatcherite detention centre.

Paul, who didn’t need his second identify talked about, noticed his brother change into hooked on heroin and die of an overdose after he emerged “damaged” from a centre in Kent.

Mark was wrongfully convicted for attacking a person with a bottle, regardless of the true perpetrator confessing to police, after which “punished” for making an attempt an attraction, his brother mentioned.

“He instructed me of getting to face bare for over 24 hours in a spot the place workers and others have been passing,” the 64-year-old added.

“He mentioned he had chilly water thrown over him they usually have been at all times crushed up.”

In a sample described by victims throughout the nation, officers would hit Mark if he addressed them with out calling them “sir”.

His brother believes he was sexually abused, with him referring to some abuse as “too unhealthy to speak about”.

“That they had the impression this was authorised by Maggie Thatcher, as in the event that they have been on direct orders from the Prime Minister to hold out this abuse,” Paul added. “He hadn’t finished something incorrect. It simply broke him, it broke his spirit.”

Mark tried to return to work as a carpenter when he was launched after 4 months however rapidly developed a heroin behavior and died on the age of 23.

Boys imprisoned at Kirklevington Detention Centre in contrast the regime to a “sadistic, brutal focus camp”.

Keith arrived there on the age of 14 along with his brother and mentioned he suffered violent bodily abuse from the second he handed by means of the gates.

He and one other boy tried to flee the centre however have been caught, being “crushed and dragged down the corridors” earlier than being put in solitary confinement.
hmp-kirklevington-grange.jpg
HMP Kirklevington (Google Avenue View)

“We have been bodily abused every day, it was a time once I believed they might kill me,” mentioned Keith.

“The workers on this place have been simply sadistic and appeared to get pleasure from abusing younger boys… we have been all made to intentionally go hungry and purposely served small parts of meals, all letters to household have been censored and dictated within the eating corridor.”

Removed from “deterring criminals” – the Tory authorities’s said intention – Keith mentioned the expertise left him with a lifelong hatred for authority, including: “I at all times noticed them because the enemy. I went on to spend most of my life out and in of prisons.”

He ended his final sentence 18 years in the past and now has a steady life working his personal enterprise, however believes that his path would have been completely different if he had not been abused.

“I felt that if I used to be handled humanely then maybe I might have had a a lot better probability,” he added.

“What occurred in Kirklevington was an absolute shame and tragic for a lot of. I really feel that they merely ripped out my spirit and turned me into an anti-authoritarian legal.”

Lee, who was incarcerated at Eastwood Park, Gloucestershire, in 1986, mentioned the “horrific” expertise has contributed to life-long psychological sickness.

“There isn’t any doubt that after over 30 years of being held there, the emotional scars are nonetheless there from my expertise and can stick with me without end,” he mentioned.

Lee, now 47, mentioned he and the 2 different boys he arrived with have been made to strip bare by two guards sitting behind a desk.

“We have been made to face there for what felt like hours whereas they simply stared at us and hurled verbal abuse,” he recalled.

“For the entire time I used to be there, it was waves and waves of verbal and bodily abuse.

“If I wasn’t been sworn at for no motive in any respect, I used to be both pushed, punched or kicked, this might have been for one thing so simple as not having my sleeves rolled up correctly or what was perceived to be uncombed hair.

willie-whitelaw.jpg
William Whitelaw, Margaret Thatcher’s Residence Secretary, turned identified for implementing the ‘brief, sharp shock’ coverage (Hulton Archive)
“All through the nights there could be fixed banging noises or guards in tremendous vocal type over the PA system and even kicking cell doorways loudly, something to maintain waking us up and customarily having damaged sleep.”

Lee mentioned the youngsters have been woken up at 5am each morning, with “uncomfortable and intimidating” guards watching them bathe.

David Greenwood, the top of kid abuse at Switalskis Solicitors, is representing dozens of claimants who suffered in youth detention centres.

He mentioned there was a “very particular hyperlink” between the abuse and the Thatcherite brief, sharp shock coverage.

“These guards got the inexperienced mild to assault detainees and there have been no questions requested,” he mentioned.

“When boys did make complaints after they have been launched, they have been ignored.”

Mr Greenwood mentioned that though he has been contacted by some males who didn’t reoffend after being launched, they have been within the minority.

“Most have been in for misdemeanours like theft or receiving stolen items – stuff you would by no means ship individuals to youth detention centre for these days,” he added.

“The bulk have their lives despatched down the opposite path with this sort of therapy, particularly with sexual abuse as properly.”

HM Jail and Probation Service (HMPPS) mentioned the allegations could be lined by the continuing Impartial Inquiry into Youngster Sexual Abuse.

A HMPPS spokesperson mentioned: “There’s already an onquiry trying into these allegations, which is a part of the IICSA.

“The allegations of abuse by former members of workers at Medomsley Detention Centre are topic to an ongoing police investigation, subsequently it could be inappropriate to remark additional.”

Source

‘Short, sharp shock’ ruined my life: Abuse victims describe brutal reality of youth detention centres under Thatcher

Former inmates say their lives spiralled into violence and addiction because of trauma from ‘sadistic, brutal concentration camps’ 

 ‘What happened was an absolute disgrace and tragic for many,’ says one former detainee. ‘I feel that they simply ripped out my spirit and turned me into an anti-authoritarian criminal’ Getty

Margaret Thatcher’s government rode into office on the back of a manifesto that promised to fight crime by giving young offenders a “short, sharp shock” at detention centres.

Ministers claimed army-style discipline would deter youngsters from a life of crime, but the boys who lived through the brutal regime the policy inspired through the late 1970s and 1980s tell a very different story.

It is one of beatings, humiliation and sexual assault at “sadistic, brutal concentration camps”, with some teenagers driven to suicide and others saying the trauma sparked a worsening cycle of violence and addiction.




“We were physically abused on a daily basis, it was a time when I believed they would kill me,” said Keith, who was imprisoned at the age of 14.

Dozens of victims are calling for a public inquiry into the abuse as police investigate allegations relating to Medomsley Detention Centre in County Durham and Kirklevington Detention Centre in North Yorkshire, where over 400 victims have already come forward.

But the scale of the abuse is far wider according to men who have told The Independent of their treatment at centres as far apart as Kent, Lincolnshire and Gloucestershire.

James Carré-Rice said he “spiralled into violence” after being held at Whatton Detention Centre in Nottinghamshire and went on to serve three more sentences.

“When I got to reception one of the officers came out and asked me my name, he seemed quite friendly,” he said.

“I said it was Jimmy and he punched me in the face and said: ‘You have to call me Sir’.
“It was terrifying for everybody. They were grown men, they didn’t like us.

Margaret Thatcher’s government brought in the short, sharp shock regime in the belief it would reduce reoffending (Getty)

“We weren’t doing anything wrong but every one of us was beaten, punished, humiliated.”

Mr Carré-Rice, who has since written books based on his experiences, said the abuse appeared to be “random”.

He was 15 at the time and described other children in the centre crying at night, adding: “The way they were treated was out of all proportion to what they had done wrong and it sent them the wrong way.

“I can remember them drumming into your head that you were scum, you were worthless, you were useless, a failure to society. It’s difficult to shake those labels off.”

One of Mr Carré-Rice’s school friends was imprisoned during the same centre, being severely beaten by officers who caught him dancing in a corridor. Within a month of his release, the boy hung himself.

He said the idea of disciplining teenagers using violence like the “short, sharp shock” would never work, adding: “If you have a system like that, you’re reinforcing cycles of behaviour that you’ll never get out of… no one thought it through.

“I think the staff thought they were doing their duty for king and country but there were no parameters or system of control.”

Mr Carré-Rice’s friend was not the only inmate to die after leaving a Thatcherite detention centre.

Paul, who did not want his second name mentioned, saw his brother become addicted to heroin and die of an overdose after he emerged “broken” from a centre in Kent.

Mark was wrongfully convicted for attacking a man with a bottle, despite the real culprit confessing to police, and then “punished” for attempting an appeal, his brother said.

Source


Tuesday, 16 January 2018

Seven former Medomsley prison, in Consett, officers in court charged with abusing teenage inmates

Seven former Medomsley prison, in Consett, officers in court charged with abusing teenage inmates

Neil Hunter Crime Correspondent
  SEVEN former prison officers who worked at a detention centre appeared in court today charged with abusing teenage inmates in the 1970s and 1980s.

The ex-staff members who worked at Medomsley Detention Centre in Consett, County Durham, were at Teesside Crown Court for an unusual hearing.

Dozens of alleged victims were in court, and a court room next door had to be used to house the others - with a live video-link relaying proceedings.

None of the accused - who are now all in their 60s and 70s - entered pleas to the allegations they face, and dates for fresh hearings were set.

The charges are the result of one of the country's biggest inquiries into sexual and physical abuse - Operation Seabrook, which was launched in August 2013.

All the former prison officers are charged with misconduct in a public office and physical abuse. Four of them are also charged with sex offences.

The defendants are:
  • Kevin Blakey, 65, charged with two counts of misconduct, two counts of wounding and two of assault.
  • Alan Bramley, 69, charged with misconduct, wounding and two counts of assault.
  • Johnson Brian Greenwell, 70, charged with misconduct, false imprisonment, two counts of assault and a further count of committing a serious sexual offence.
  • David McClure, 62, charged with misconduct, wounding and four counts of assault.
  • John McGee, 73, charged with misconduct, four counts of assault, two counts of indecent assault, wounding and a further count of committing a serious sexual offence.
  • Christopher Onslow, 71, charged with two counts of misconduct, two of buggery without consent, two counts of wounding, two counts of wounding with intent, three counts of assault and one of indecent assault.
  • Neil Sowerby, 60, charged with misconduct, two counts of assault, four counts of indecent assault and three counts of committing a serious sexual offence.
Their addresses cannot be reported for legal reasons, and none of the alleged victims can be identified.

The detention centre, which was closed in 1988, was used for teenage offenders who often had committed minor crimes. They were usually held there for six to eight weeks.

Almost 1,500 former detainees claimed they were abused at the young offenders' institution.

Prosecutor Jamie Hill, QC, told Judge Howard Crowson during the hour-long hearing that the expected trial would last between 12 and 14 weeks.

Mr Hill said there will be around 15,000 pages of material linked to the case, along with 235 witnesses - 70 of whom are likely to be complainants.

"This is a police investigation which has lasted approximately four years, and the police have had over 1,400 complaints relating to events at Medomsley, principally in the 70s and 80s," said Mr Hill.

"The way the indictment is drafted, and there are 49 counts for these seven defendants, there are individual charges highlighting the most serious allegations against them and a small handful of common complaints.

"It is conceded this is a large case . . . [but] this is a huge distillation of the case. This case will have evidence from roughly 70 of the 1,400-plus complainants.

"Our current time estimate for these seven is approximately 12 to 14 weeks, taking into account prosecution evidence, defence evidence, speeches and summing up."

A provisional date for the trial to start - as all the men are expected to plead not guilty at some stage - was set by Judge Crowson for September 3.

The defendants were all released on bail.

Source